7 results for author: Julie Jeliazovski


New Research Shows SOIL’s Compost Often More Effective Than Chemical Fertilizer

Photo credit: Tony Marcelli Last June, we introduced our readers to Estrella Ardanza and Susana Perez Bejar, two Cranfield University students who have been busy studying the impact of SOIL’s Konpòs Lakay compost on native Haitian plants for their Master's theses. After months of hard work and thoughtful collaboration, we’re excited to share that the numbers have been crunched and the theses have been written. SOIL is dedicated to developing innovative and research-based ecological sanitation solutions here in Haiti and for years we’ve partnered with farmers and research institutions to study the impact of our compost on local core crops. ...

SOIL Staff Summer Project Bears Fruit

The SOIL team takes a lot of pride both in our lush office gardens and in the various plants that flourish throughout our composting sites. We love to encourage biodiversity by planting a wide variety of local species - whether that’s coconut trees, mango trees, or smaller flowery bushes like the beautiful bougainvillea seen throughout Haiti. In the backyards of our offices and across the country, these plants attract birds and insects and act as a peaceful oasis for many other species. Each day SOIL transforms human waste into rich, organic compost and this summer our staff decided to take our dedication to composting a step further by committ...

200 Pounds of Compost, Over 7,000 Kilometers and 1 Partnership

In a neat new research collaboration with implications on how we use and market compost in Haiti, SOIL is working with researchers at Cranfield University in the UK to evaluate the agricultural impact of SOIL's compost (Konpòs Lakay). This work can be summarized in numbers: 2 students will research the potential of Konpòs Lakay as part of their Master’s theses in the university’s greenhouse and laboratories. A third student will research a different kind of organic fertilizer to serve as a comparison. For this purpose, 200 pounds of SOIL's Konpòs Lakay were shipped from Port-au-Prince to Cranfield along with a few hundred Moringa ...

SOIL U

Regular readers of the SOIL blog will know that in November our amazing weather station in Limonade went live, and that since that time, it has been sharing the local weather data with the world. Rainfall, temperature, wind direction and speed, pressure… it’s all there for anyone to access! Last month, the University of Limonade requested a tour of our waste treatment site so they could see the weather station and hear about how it works and what we do with the data. They were also interested in using the data in their own curriculum, as an educational tool, because weather data in Haiti can be quite difficult to obtain. Ultimately there ...

Empowering women. Period.

All around the world, women and girls face a monthly reality: menstruation. Periods are often taboo, something shameful, to be hidden away and never mentioned. Certainly menstruation is often considered a women-only topic – we ask each other for help if we’re in a tight spot and have forgotten a pad or tampon, we talk in coded language about cramps, irritation, and other inconveniences we tend to bear in silence each month. It is truly unfortunate that menstruation is still considered a shameful and unacceptable topic in most places. And for many women silence is just one of many challenges they face each month. In countries where access to ...

New Beginnings: SOIL’s New Compost Site in Port-au-Prince

Regular readers of SOIL's blog may remember that we committed to transforming our composting site at the municipal waste dump in Truitier into a green oasis. Just over one year after starting operations in Truitier, we had made significant progress on this transformation and updated all of you with the blog:  Transforming Truitier. Since then, the trees have continued to grow and hundreds of butterflies have taken up residence in the site, creating a beautiful oasis within the municipal dump site. Scenes from SOIL's green compost side in the Port-au-Prince city dump The larger Truitier municipal waste site, however, has continued to ...

Sunscreen or Rubber Boots? SOIL Has a Weather Station!

Last month we started collecting meteorological data at our composting site in northern Haiti. Currently, very few weather records are available in Haiti, and only a handful of stations publicly share the data they collect. With help from Becca Ryals and Gavin McNicol, our research partners from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, we built a brand new weather station at our northern compost site that offers a new, publicly-available source of continuous, local weather information! In fact, we set up the weather station just days after a tropical storm dumped massive amounts of rain on northern Haiti, flooding many people out of their homes, ...