44 results for author: SOIL In the News


USAID’s Global Waters: Innovation for the World’s Most Intractable Problems

SOIL was honored to join bright minds from around the globe to discuss solutions to some of the world's most intractable problems during last month's Global Innovation Week in Washington D.C.  The Innovation Marketplace, hosted by USAID's Global Development Lab, welcomed SOIL and other global innovators to showcase new technologies and interventions in the WASH sector and beyond. Luckily for our blog readers that weren't able to join us in DC, USAID's GlobalWaters.org shared the story of SOIL's work to build sustainable solutions to meaningfully respond to Haiti's sanitation crisis. From the article: "Molly Case, deputy development direct...

Digitizing SOIL’s Sanitation Service

Photo: Vic Hinterlang SOIL began using TaroWork's digital tools last year to collect payments, manage customer accounts, conduct research, and test marketing strategies. The data that we've since collected is already helping us to optimize our logistics and make refinements to EkoLakay, like rolling out a mobile payment collection service. Last month, SOIL Systems Director Erica Lloyd and Marketing and Sales Advisor Shannon Smith joined a webinar for TaroWorks to discuss how SOIL has digitized EkoLakay's sales and operational activities to refine and scale up our ecological sanitation service. We're excited to share what we've learned and how ...

Next Billion: Rethinking the Flush Toilet

Photo: Virginia Gardiner As a founding member of the Container-Based Sanitation (CBS) Alliance, SOIL is proud to see other container-based technologies gaining steam worldwide. In an article for Next Billion, LooWatt's Virginia Gardiner explains that it's necessary to shift away from seeing flush toilets as the solution to the sanitation crisis and argues that CBS systems, like SOIL's EkoLakay in-home toilet, are the most viable sanitation intervention for rapidly urbanizing communities. From Next Billion's article: "In the 21st century, sanitation infrastructure has to move off the grid, just as mobile communications did in the 20th. A growing ...

National Geographic: Nearly a Billion People Still Defecate Outdoors. Here’s Why.

The latest issue of National Geographic magazine explores how open air defecation practices are becoming increasingly hazardous to public health in our rapidly urbanizing world. Traditional sanitation solutions are often infeasible and cost-prohibitive, though sustainable alternatives - such as EkoLakay's composting toilet that SOIL is pioneering in Haiti - are responding to the crisis. From National Geographic: "In [Cap-Haïtien] a worker from Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL), a nonprofit organization, delivers a new bucket and takes away one that’s full of waste from a family’s composting toilet. He’ll deliver the solid ...

Devex: How a new toolkit is helping nonprofits like SOIL budget for risk

Devex's recent article highlighted SOIL's partnership with the Open Road Alliance, who helped us overcome literal road blocks and plan for future risk. Open Road's support allowed us to continue to grow EkoLakay, our partnership with the Haitian government, and a model research site designed to support the replication of SOIL’s work around Haiti and the world. From Devex: "Every NGO faces roadblocks at one point or another. But SOIL, an organization working to address the sanitation problem in Haiti, was literally prevented from getting from point A to point B. Burning piles of debris blocked the road to its composting waste treatment site ...

TeleSur: Organization Improves Sanitation in Haiti With Toilets

We're excited to share that TeleSur English featured SOIL's EkoLakay household composting toilet service as a uniquely viable solution to the sanitation crisis in Haiti. The article features excerpts from a recent NPR-KGOU interview with our Deputy Director, Nick Preneta. Read on! From TeleSur English: "SOIL provides a household toilet service called EkoLakay. Customers rent a locally-made eco-friendly composting toilet in their home for approximately US$3-4 per month. The organization [collects] the full buckets and transports the waste to its compost sites, where the waste is transformed into nutrient-rich compost. “We have a member of our ...

NPR’s KGOU: Organization Strives To Improve Sanitation In Haiti One Toilet At A Time

SOIL’s deputy director Nick Preneta sat down with NPR in Oklahoma to talk about the sanitation crisis and the transformative power of SOIL’s EkoLakay composting toilets. He discussed the impact of SOIL’s social business approach to ecological sanitation, and how we’re collaborating with other container based sanitation projects around the world to grow and refine our model. From the interview with NPR affiliate KGOU: “People often see [poop] as a waste but we look at it as a resource. And so our model, we cover the entire sanitation chain and we look specifically at urban areas where we do everything from produce the toilet and market ...

World Economic Forum: The world needs more toilets, but Western solutions aren’t the answer

Here at SOIL we are thrilled to see this thoughtful piece from the World Economic Forum questioning the need for flush toilets and traditional sewerage systems. For ten years we have worked in Haiti to implement sustainable sanitation solutions that require no water and no infrastructure. Our toilets transform human waste into rich compost, recapturing the nutrients in human waste that are so often lost in a flush. From the World Economic Forum: "The invention of the flush toilet, or water closet, in 1596 ended open defecation and transferred excreta outside of homes for the first time. This was certainly a good thing in the short term, but ...

BBC: Toilets in Haiti and Circular Runways

"There are no sewers in Haiti. 26% of Haitians have access to a toilet, so a lot of the sewage ends up in the water supply. Currently, Haiti is battling the biggest cholera epidemic in recent history and thousands are dying. We travel there to meet a team of women who are trying to solve this massive problem." Listen to the interview at BBC World Service on March, 28 2017. Support SOIL Other Recent SOIL Coverage  

BBC: Why are People Paying $6 for a Bag of Human Waste?

Why are People Paying $6 for a Bag of Human Waste? The women saving lives using sewage. Posted by BBC on March, 28 2017 Support SOIL Other Recent SOIL Coverage