29 results for author: SOIL Volunteer


The Story of NPK

If you're a regular reader of this blog, you know that we think Konpòs Lakay, SOIL's organic compost, is a pretty amazing thing. But unless you're a farmer or avid gardener yourself, you may not know why! After all, when you're surveying row after row of beautiful fresh produce at the grocery store or farmers' market, it can be easy to forget that growing fruits and vegetables is no simple task. But while those strawberries might look (and taste!) sweet, they're actually very demanding organisms, requiring a precise diet of nutrients in the soil in order to survive. Of those nutrients, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium (often referred to as NPK, ...

Goats, Blindfolds, and Bandits: SOIL Hosts Training for Red Cross Staff

Blindfolded participants navigating their way through a web of ropes, a forest of saplings, and around a goat? While it may sounds like some kind of strange party game, this was actually an educational demonstration during a recent SOIL workshop. SOIL hosted its first Green Recovery Reconstruction Training (GRRT), part of our continuing collaboration with the Red Cross and the World Wildlife Foundation. This training was the first in a series of new workshops, each of which focus on ecological sanitation in Haiti within the context of disaster risk reduction, environmental awareness, and climate change adaptation. The day began with a thorough ...

Letters to SOIL: EcoSan Around the Globe

[box type="shadow"]SOIL Letters is a blog series featuring some of the beautiful letters we've received over the years in support of the work we're doing in Haiti.[/box] Here at SOIL, we are committed to sharing our knowledge and resources, because we know that when more people are empowered through education, we can accelerate change and achieve our vision of safe, dignified, sustainable sanitation that is accessible to all Haitians - and all those living in impoverished communities around the world. The SOIL Guide to Ecological Sanitation was created in response to countless requests from individuals and organizations interested in starting ...

When a Little Education Goes a Long Way

Concern, an international humanitarian relief organization, recently contracted SOIL to lead a training session for families in La Gonave using Concern EcoSan toilets. La Gonave is a small island off the coast of Port-au-Prince, and in the wake of the cholera epidemic that swept the nation after the 2010 earthquake, Concern built over 380 household EcoSan toilets for families there. Because it was an emergency response, there was little opportunity for community education, leaving many families in doubt as to how to properly use and maintain their new toilets. Without the training on how to use composting cover material, safely remove waste, and ...

Sustainable Sanitation Conference Update: We Did It!

Last week's Sustainable Sanitation Conference was an incredible success. The two-day conference, held in Port au Prince and co-hosted by SOIL and UNICEF, was attended by over 150 people representing more than fifty groups and organizations. Over two days, participants shared information about sustainable sanitation work in Haiti from a variety of perspectives, taking the opportunity to learn from each others' successes and challenges. If you were unable to attend the conference but are interested in learning more, there will be a newsletter and a report on 'Next Steps' released within a week. Additionally, all of the presentations from the conference ...

Warm Welcome in Mukuru

Thanks to Kui Mungai (pictured at left) and SANERGY for their warm welcome in Mukuru, and their kind words after! In her article "Kindred Composting Spirits: A Visit from Haiti," Kui was enthusiastic about meeting Sasha and Anthony and sharing ideas, strategies, and knowledge about composting human wastes. Below is an excerpt from the post: "In mid-May, SANERGY welcomed Sasha Kramer and Anthony Kilbride of SOIL to our field site in Mukuru. We thought we were crazy about human waste until we meet up with Sasha and Anthony – they adore waste! SOIL (Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods) is an organization based in Haiti that converts human waste ...

The Missourian: Cyclists Supporting Global Health Stop in Washington

by Paul Hackbarth in The Missourian on 30 May, 2012 About 20 cyclists stopped overnight Wednesday, May 16, in Washington as part of a 3,700-mile ride to raise awareness about global health issues. The cyclists were with Ride for World Health, a nonprofit group, and began April 11 in San Diego, Calif., and will end in Bethany Beach, Del., June 3. The cyclists are fourth-year medical students from Ohio, New York, Indiana, Texas and Massachusetts. Two of the riders are Nicole and Brad Siegele, a married couple from Dallas, Texas, who acted as crew members Wednesday afternoon. Cyclists take turns riding and rotate about every five to six days. About ...

Mainstreet NS: "Haiti: Where Did the Money Go?"

Michele Mitchell, director of the recently released documentary "Haiti: Where Did the Money Go?" speaks with Nova Scotia Mainstreet CBC about her film, post-earthquake relief efforts in Haiti, and the need for accountability in development work. During the interview, Michele gave SOIL a great  shout-out: "Worthy organizations, I'll name one right now: SOIL. It's run by a wonderful young woman...what she's doing on the ground in Haiti with compost toilets and sanitation is incredible, and you know what? She's not a big organization. Hopefully organizations like hers...and others that are deserving will get the support that they deserve." (Nova Scotia ...

National Geographic Photo Camp comes to Cite Soleil

Friday was clear and hot, as 18 young Haitians from around Port au Prince piled out of vans onto the concrete soccer field in Pax Christi, site of the collaborative EcoSan and garden projects of SOIL and Bochika. The students were selected from their communities to participate in the week-long program, learning about cameras and shooting techniques. Every day they visited different sites and learned to capture images, from which they produced their own photo book at the end. National Geographic staff led them to the composting toilets where Sasha and Franz explained the composting toilet project, and how the compost produced from the toilets goes ...