347 results for author: SOILHaiti


Restoring Soils in our own Backyard

SOIL’s household sanitation service was designed with nature as our guide, and as such, as we expand the reach of EkoLakay in urban Haiti, we’re producing more of the compost that makes its way back to the soil to support critically needed restoration efforts. After centuries of deforestation and erosion, poverty, and intensive colonial agricultural practices, soils in Haiti have become dangerously degraded. Before they can support the growth of bountiful harvests or reforestation initiatives, degraded soils need to be restored both with necessary nutrients and with organic matter (which is lacking in chemical fertilizers that are commonly ...

New World Bank Report Explores Impact of SOIL’s Sanitation Service

Business as usual in sanitation isn’t working, argues the World Bank. In cities experiencing rapid urbanization, they suggest that “the traditional approach to urban sanitation, premised on extending sewerage networks and building wastewater treatment plants, will not be sufficient to deliver citywide sanitation services for all.” And, in the Bank’s newly released report on Container-Based Sanitation (CBS) solutions, they argue that alternatives are needed to deliver inclusive sanitation in these contexts.

Keeping EkoLakay Active in a Country on Lockdown

An Update from Haiti Though coverage in the international media remains scarce, Haiti is now entering day 10 of a deepening political crisis that follows months of increasingly challenging conditions faced by the majority of the population. Inflation has been spiraling out of control, making it even more difficult for vulnerable families across the nation to afford basic essentials. Fuel and electricity have become more and more scarce and allegations of corruption against many members of the ruling party, including the President, have led to mass unrest as people demand accountability and transparency for missing development funds. The ...

Join CBSA at AfricaSan/FSM5

SOIL is excited to be in Cape Town this week with some of the world's leading sustainable sanitation practitioners at AfricaSan/FSM5. If you're in South Africa for the conference, see the event flyers below and be sure to join us for one of the events hosted by the Container-Based Sanitation Alliance (CBSA). Want to learn more about CBS solutions? Check out this video featuring SOIL and fellow CBSA members by following this link. Support SOIL SOIL depends on individual donations from people like you to fund our work in Haiti. Please consider supporting SOIL today.   Want to keep reading? Check out these other recent posts on the ...

February Newsletter: An Update from Haiti

To sign up to receive an update from SOIL's teams in Haiti directly in your inbox each month, click here to join the list. Dear friends,This month, I felt it would be irresponsible not to directly address the challenging situation that is ongoing in Haiti. As some of you may have heard, the entire country has been on lockdown for the past six days as demonstrators take to the streets in a growing movement demanding the resignation of the president, justice for those accused of embezzling billions in development funds, and a solution to the economic crisis that is gripping the country. So far the government has remained silent, and there is an ...

Refining SOIL’s Path to Financial Sustainability

SOIL is hard at work to refine our household ecological sanitation service, EkoLakay, so that we have a strong foundation as we grow to reach 15% of Cap-Haitien’s urban population with safely managed sanitation by 2025.  As a part of these efforts, SOIL had the honor of hosting Peter Townsley in Cap-Haitien for a month late last year. Peter is the former CEO of a fellow Container-Based Sanitation Alliance (CBSA) member, Clean Team in Ghana, and he was instrumental in transforming their sanitation business into rapidly growing enterprise on a clear pathway towards financial sustainability. Although SOIL faces different challenges as we develop our ...

Sanitation for a Rapidly Urbanizing World

Over 700 million people living in urban areas globally currently lack access to even basic sanitation, and without innovation this problem will only get worse. The global urban population is projected to increase by 2.5 billion people by 2050, with much of that growth concentrated in informal settlements and locations that are highly vulnerable to natural disasters and climate change impacts*. It is critical to identify innovative technological solutions, services, and financing mechanisms to meet the sanitation needs of people living in rapidly growing urban settlements. Why are urban settlements particularly challenging to reach with ...

Global Sanitation Success Stories

SOIL's friends at cewas and the EcoSan Club publish a quarterly Sustainable Sanitation Practice journal which gathers stories of ecological sanitation systems, big or small, that are flourishing around the world. We are excited that SOIL is featured in the journal's latest edition as one of the stories of success. SOIL's article explores the lessons that SOIL has learned as we've worked to build a regenerative urban sanitation service and outlines how we're prioritizing inclusive innovation, responsible growth, and close engagement with the public sector along the way. Click here to read the article and let us know what you think in the comment ...

Making Sanitation Accessible

We talk a lot at SOIL about increasing access to sanitation in Haiti. We’re hard at work to expand our programs every day as we work to build a city-wide sanitation service in a country where 75% of people lack access to a toilet. But what does it mean to build a service that’s truly accessible? As we work to expand our EkoLakay service into new homes and new neighborhoods in the years to come, we’re also thinking about expanding access in a different way. For people with different levels of physical ability, making your way to a room far from your bed to use the restroom can be a huge challenge. With that in mind, SOIL designed a toilet that ...

In Remembrance

Dear friends, In countries and cultures around the world, there are days of collective celebration and days of collective mourning and remembrance. At the beginning of the year, most of us are focused on celebration - the beginning of a new year, the endless possibilities that await us, the unique moment of joy in the unknown future. In Haiti, that same joy is punctuated with a day of shared sorrow and renewed grief. Today, nine years after the earthquake that claimed so many lives and changed so many others, Haiti's bustle and vibrancy fall quiet as those who remain stop to remember those who were lost. Today, we acknowledge that these nine ...