389 results for author: SOILHaiti


Moving On

Today we share the news with you that SOIL co-founder Sarah Brownell and husband Kevin Foos officially resigned from SOIL in early January. Kevin had been struggling with malaria and dengue fever, and is now recovering slowly in New York.  On a happier note, they found out they are also expecting a baby! We are laden with a conflicted heart, as we are sorry to see them go, yet excited for the next phase of their lives as a growing family. Thank you Sarah and Kevin for your commitment and partnership over the years. We wish you the best of luck in New York, and know that this is not goodbye, only see you later.

New Project and New Employees!

SOIL has recently begun a new project in Port-au-Prince with OXFAM GB. Along with the new project have come new employees! SOIL is glad to welcome Nick Preneta and Amy Ross to the team in PAP. Be sure to check out their bios on the website, and check back soon for more information about the OXFAM project!

Slightly Delayed Blog Entry From My Time in Port-au-Prince

Today marks the one-month anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti and marks the beginning of a three day period of mourning and remembrance. The usually busy streets of Port au Prince are quiet while the churches are full of people praying and singing in unison. We spent most of the morning distributing water that we purchased to the church services going on in Cite Soleil, where aid has been slow to come. We then drove out to the municipal garbage site, where we saw human waste being mixed with medical waste and garbage. We saw puddles full of worms and used syringes near where children were playing and people are living. This is the site that has ...

Phone Calls to Haiti

Dear Friends, I apologize for my silence over the last week or so.  I am just too devastated to be able to write anything coherent.  Kevin is recovering from malaria and is now able to spend more of a day off the couch than on it.  We are trying to keep in touch and do what we can from the US. I finally got through to Haiti by phone last night for the first time. Estimable Francius Dauphin, aka Jhonny, the mayor of Borgne, reports that people from Borgne who had been living in Port au Prince are starting to return to their families in the countryside. The mayor’s office sent a bus down to the capital to pick up survivors and came back with ...

Vanity Fair: The Light That Will Heal Haiti

By Nell Scovell in Vanity Fair, January 19, 2010 Sasha Kramer buried an amputated leg in Haiti yesterday. Exeter-bred with a Stanford Ph. D. , Sasha is an ecologist and human rights worker who has been living in Haiti for years as co-founder of SOIL, a non-profit organization focusing on sanitation. That work has been put on hold. As Sasha wrote on January 15th: “In one night our world changed in Haiti.” Based in Cap Haitian, where damage was minimal, Sasha headed to Port-Au-Prince the day after the quake. She is now blogging about relief efforts, offering a personal, moving account and calling into question some of the reports on CNN. You ...

The New York Times: A Most Meaningful Gift Idea by Nicholas D. Kristof

By Nicholas D. Kristof, New York Times December 23, 2009 Are the kids demanding the latest murder-and-mayhem video game? Do your loved ones have all the neckties/bottles of perfume/sweaters that can be used in a lifetime? Tired of celebrating spiritual holidays with crass commercialism? If so, then perhaps it’s time to try a different kind of gift. After all, nothing says “happy holidays” like donating in Aunt Tilda’s name to build a composting toilet in Haiti or to deworm kids in Kenya. And a deworming pill will never be regifted! This time of year I’m always barraged with inquiries about well-run charitable groups doing effect...

Reed Magazine: Madness and Sanitation in Haiti

By Matt Davis, Reed Magazine, Summer 2009 In the annals of public relations, it must be reckoned a signal achievement to persuade a skeptical New York Times reporter to stick his nose in a bucket of poop. But Sasha Kramer ’99 pulled off this reverse form of gotcha journalism with ease in March when she coaxed Pulitzer prizewinner Nicholas Kristof to sniff a handful of compost harvested from a toilet in Cap Haïtien, Haiti. Kristof had flown to Haiti to film a video series titled American Ingenuity Abroad and interviewed Sasha and cofounder Sarah Brownell about Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods, a nonprofit dedicated to solving two of ...

The New York Times: A Boy Living in a Car by Nicholas D. Kristof

By Nicholas D. Kristof, New York Times, March 28, 2009 As America’s unemployment rate rises, those paying the severest price aren’t necessarily in Detroit or Miami. One of the newest street children here in this northern Haitian city is a 10-year-old boy whose father was working in Florida but lost his job and can no longer send money home. As a result, the family here was evicted, the mother and children went separate ways to improve their odds of finding shelter, and the boy found refuge in an abandoned wreck of a car. The boy is one of 46 million people in the developing world — more than double the New York State population — who will be ...

National Geographic: Haiti Soil

By Joel K. Bourne, Jr., National Geographic, September 2008 But there is more at stake than simply the ability of Haitian soil to feed a starving nation. Food-importing nations around the world also are suffering as the prices of staples skyrocket, raising critical questions about the goals of agricultural-assistance programs that over the past few decades have focused more on reducing tariffs and growing crops for export than on helping poor nations feed themselves. That's as it should be, officials say. "Food self-sufficiency is not necessarily the goal," says Beth Cypser, deputy director of the U.S. Agency for International Development ...