Latest Updates


New Mural in Miami’s Little Haiti Honors SOIL’s Work

At SOIL we are always humbled by the outpouring of generous and creative support we receive from SOIL cultivators and friends across the world who allow us to incubate sustainable sanitation solutions for Haiti’s most vulnerable communities. Some of our most creative support to date has come out of one high school in Miami – which has a club dedicated solely to advocating SOIL’s mission to transform waste into resources in Haiti! At the end of this past school year, students from the SOIL at Miami Beach Senior High Club (SOIL@MBSH) collaborated with art students ...

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EkoLakay Customer Satisfaction Report: Improved Safety, Health, and Affordability

What better time than during the dead heat of summer to charge up your smart phone and trek through the urban sprawl of Haiti to interview people about their toilets (or lack thereof)? Undeterred by the heat, this is exactly what the SOIL team has been up to this summer! The Port-au-Prince office just completed the first segment of this marketing research with a satisfaction survey to assess how current EkoLakay customers like their household EcoSan toilet. With just shy of 200 customers in the Ti Plas Kazo neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, our sample size was modest, but ...

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Global Consultancy Firm Supports EkoLakay’s Preparation for Responsible Scale-Up

Container Based Sanitation Background Traditional sanitation models - flush toilets - require a reliable water source and sewage infrastructure, both of which can be cost prohibitive and infeasible to build in urban settlements with contested land tenure. The usual alternatives, onsite systems like pit latrines and septic tanks, are also infeasible or unsafe in many urban areas due to space limitations, high water tables, and population density. With the population of urban areas set to double by 2050 and one in three people still lacking access to a toilet worldwide, ...

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Capturing the Conditions of a Microbial Revolution

The latest research SOIL is conducting, in continued collaboration with the University of Hawai’i, is assessing how the thermophilic phase of the composting process facilitates the transformation of dangerous waste into safe and nutrient-rich compost. After months of careful preparation, UH Mãnoa ecologists Gavin McNicol and Dr. Rebecca Ryals visited SOIL’s composting site in Cap Haïtien to install sensors that will monitor key variables that affect the microbial life of a compost pile: temperature, oxygen availability, and moisture. The microbial transfor...

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SOIL Staff Summer Project Bears Fruit

The SOIL team takes a lot of pride both in our lush office gardens and in the various plants that flourish throughout our composting sites. We love to encourage biodiversity by planting a wide variety of local species - whether that’s coconut trees, mango trees, or smaller flowery bushes like the beautiful bougainvillea seen throughout Haiti. In the backyards of our offices and across the country, these plants attract birds and insects and act as a peaceful oasis for many other species. Each day SOIL transforms human waste into rich, organic compost and this summer ...

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With Thanks and Gratitude

Dear friends and supporters, On behalf of the entire team here at SOIL, thank you. Together, we surpassed our goal and raised over $17,000 in support of SOIL's lifesaving household toilet program, EkoLakay. Because of your kind support, our team will be able to hit the streets and spread the word about our growing service. This year, we're focused on reducing the costs of providing the service to clients, increasing the number of EkoLakay clients in our service areas, and testing a variety of improvements to the EkoLakay service. Our goal is to provide a truly ...

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EkoLakay Goes – Faster!

Nine months ago I wrote with great excitement (and to be honest, a few nerves) about SOIL’s brand new data management initiative for EkoLakay, our household toilet service. EkoLakay is now serving about 1,000 families, and as you can imagine, with weekly waste collections, monthly subscription fees, maintenance requests, and more, there’s a [poop]load of information to manage! SOIL’s new system uses Taroworks, an Android app, so that our EkoLakay team can both view and collect data on mobile phones, even while offline. When connected to the internet, the phones ...

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SOIL Embraces Mobile Banking for Sanitation Service Payments

For a small monthly fee SOIL’s growing social business, EkoLakay, provides over 1,000 households in Haiti with ecological sanitation (EcoSan) toilets and waste treatment services. And, until recently, that meant that we visited all 1,000+ homes on the EkoLakay service every single month to collect their monthly service fee. As you can imagine, this door-to-door payment collection effort was time consuming and costly for SOIL and often inconvenient for clients. We are therefore delighted to announce that SOIL’s EkoLakay team has introduced mobile payments into the ...

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SOIL team saddened by US withdrawal from Paris Climate Agreement

As we shared last year, the SOIL team was pleased and proud that Haiti signed the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. It was a generous, though symbolic, gesture for a country that only produces 0.01% of global carbon dioxide emissions but bears the impact of climate change more severely than most nations. Amidst valid criticisms that the Paris Agreement should loosen its scrutiny for developing nations and strengthen its overall targets, which have generally been assessed to be weak, Haiti gathered the political will to ratify the Agreement in 2017. Donald Trump ...

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Published Research Confirms SOIL’s Composting Method is Effective

At SOIL, we love teaming up with scientists to explore how ecological sanitation works. And one of the main pillars of our ecological sanitation operation is transforming environment-polluting poop into nutrient-rich compost. To do this, we follow the World Health Organization (WHO) standards for human waste composting – creating piles with the ideal ratio of poop to cover material so that natural heat-tolerant bacteria will get to work and break the materials down and destroy pathogens. These piles get hot! At peak temperatures, an average pile will reach 160 degrees ...

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