Sanitation Updates: The world can’t wait for sewers

As we have shared, SOIL is proud to be a member of the Container Based Sanitation Alliance, a group of CBS organizations working around the world to combat the sanitation crisis by implementing container-based solutions. One of these organizations, Clean Team, has worked with Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP) and  Ernst & Young to produce a report evaluating their model as an innovative possibility for providing sanitation access in dense urban areas.

In the spirit of collaboration we are excited to share this report – give it a read for some more insight into the world of container based sanitation! SOIL looks forward to doing similar work to evaluate our service, so keep your ears open in the coming months. Chapo ba, Clean Team!

From Sanitation Updates:

“For many people living in low-income urban areas, a flush toilet or sewer connection is little more than a pipe dream. Often the infrastructure doesn’t exist or can’t be constructed in such densely populated or topographically challenging areas, or service fees are simply too high.

The world needs a viable, high-quality alternative to piped sanitation that can reach people living in these areas – like container-based sanitation (CBS) businesses. These enterprises are uniquely suited to the challenges of serving dense urban populations, but are not without their challenges.

This new joint report by EY and Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP) considers those obstacles, presenting insights aiming to improve CBS businesses’ prospects for success.”

Read the full post here.

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1 Reply to "Sanitation Updates: The world can’t wait for sewers"

  • Izzat
    March 13, 2017 (5:56 am)
    Reply

    We are a Trekking Company and have over 10,000 trekkers trekking with us in the Himalayas every year.
    Due to lack of toilet facilities we have a container based system using drums and cocopeat or saw dust. This is very easy to set up and maintain. The containers are emptied into a pit and left to become high quality compost that can then be used in the fields or just left there.

    Let me know if you wish for further information or would like to come and observe how we do it.


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