33 results for tag: agriculture


Celebrate World Soil Day!

photo courtesy of Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Agriculture is Haiti’s main industry and makes up over 60% of the workforce nationwide. However, food production can be quite challenging for many farmers in Haiti due to heavily degraded soils as a result of exploitative production like deforestation and over-intensive agricultural practices during the colonial era. Before farmers are able to support the growth of bountiful harvests or reforestation initiatives, degraded soils need to be restored and brought back to a natural balance. Maintaining soil health and biodiversity is critical to establishing resilient ecosys...

Composting to Restore Soil Health with Konpòs Lakay

In rural areas of Haiti, agriculture production and farming are important occupations for many people. Agriculture is Haiti’s main industry and makes up over 60% of the workforce, with main global exports including mangoes, coffee, papayas and spinach. However, food production can still be quite challenging for many farmers due to depleted soils and periods of drought. Additionally, years of foreign intervention and policy have forced Haiti to rely heavily on cheap global imports for food supply, which has distorted the market for some crops, leaving the supply chains within and into Haiti fragile. This limits access to good sources of food for many ...

Meet Marckindy, SOIL’s Composting Supervisor

Marckindy onsite at SOIL’s composting waste treatment site in Mouchinette, Northern Haiti. A couple of months ago we sat down with Marckindy Etienne, SOIL’s Composting Supervisor, to talk about his work, his connection to SOIL, and his thoughts on the role sanitation and compost can play in Haiti’s future. Marckindy has been a part of the SOIL family since his first internship in 2012, and he’s known of SOIL for even longer through his brother, Job (SOIL’s Composting Manager). A condensed version of his interview follows, translated from Haitian Creole into English. We hope you enjoy getting to know Marckindy as much as we enjoy getting to ...

Growing 250,000 Trees

Though there’s ongoing debate about the extent and proximate cause of the challenge, what is clear is that Haiti’s mountainsides are deforested to dangerous levels and the country’s farmers struggle to produce enough to feed its people, in part due to depleted soils. As a result, most of Haiti relies on expensive imported foods, a factor which contributes to a cycle of poverty for both the country’s farmers and its people.  This drives us at SOIL. And it’s why we work tirelessly to treat and transform waste into high-quality organic fertilizer, branded locally as Konpòs Lakay. Our compost is loaded with all of the nutrients needed for ...

On Climate Change Adaptation: SOIL Research Updates

As the devastating impacts of climate change continue to mount around us, especially in vulnerable frontline communities like the ones SOIL serves in Haiti, we’re more motivated than ever to grow SOIL’s climate-positive sanitation solution, which transforms a public health crisis facing cities around the world into a restorative solution for the planet. Visit this page to learn about how SOIL's regenerative sanitation service mitigates the impacts of climate change. On Adaptation Scientists and land managers have discovered that compost can help mitigate climate change by enhancing the ability of ecosystems to pull carbon dioxide from the ...

200 Pounds of Compost, Over 7,000 Kilometers and 1 Partnership

In a neat new research collaboration with implications on how we use and market compost in Haiti, SOIL is working with researchers at Cranfield University in the UK to evaluate the agricultural impact of SOIL's compost (Konpòs Lakay). This work can be summarized in numbers: 2 students will research the potential of Konpòs Lakay as part of their Master’s theses in the university’s greenhouse and laboratories. A third student will research a different kind of organic fertilizer to serve as a comparison. For this purpose, 200 pounds of SOIL's Konpòs Lakay were shipped from Port-au-Prince to Cranfield along with a few hundred Moringa ...

CBS News: Sowing seeds of hope for Haiti’s future

We are excited and honored to share a beautiful piece about our dear friend and partner Daniel Tilias and his organization, SAKALA, based in Cite Soleil. Daniel has worked tirelessly to create local solutions to Haiti's intertwined issues of environmental degradation, lack of employment opportunities, and need for safe spaces for children to learn and play. Check out this video and article from CBS News to see how far SAKALA has come since its founding in 2002 - and look out for a SOIL cameo near the end! Want to keep reading?

The POOP Project: You’re Tuned to CBS: SOIL’s Sasha Kramer, Kory Russel and Container Based Sanitation


SOIL Partners with St. Barnabas Agricultural College

St. Barnabas Agricultural College (CASB) is an institution with a vision to provide sustainable agricultural services to Haiti’s Northern region, and the school is using both SOIL’s EkoMobil mobile toilets and compost, Konpòs Lakay, to help achieve that goal! The two-year agriculture technician program is expanding: they are currently constructing new academic facilities and bringing unused plots of land back into agricultural production. The school hopes to have irrigated orchards and crops, aquaponics, an animal husbandry facility, and community gardens where CASB students and neighbors will be able to grow their own food and sell what they ...

SOIL Celebrates May Day at the Annual Limbé Festival

May Day, or Agriculture and Labor Day here in Haiti, is celebrated as a national public holiday. One may wonder about the state of agricultural production here in Haiti after many decades of deforestation and environmental degradation. What is there to celebrate when Haiti is losing over 30 million metric tons of top soil every year and has to import the majority of its food? Haiti used to be known as the “Pearl of the Antilles,” producing so much that it exported the majority of its food. At SOIL, we believe that it’s important to celebrate all the work that local communities are doing to improve agriculture systems and support the dream ...