7 results for tag: composting


Webinar: SOIL Talks Climate Connections with ILSR

Last week, SOIL’s Executive Director and Co-Founder Dr. Sasha Kramer presented on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance’s Compost Climate Connections series webinar. Sasha discussed the role compost plays in mitigating climate change, how ecological sanitation systems work, and the benefits of a circular economy approach to sanitation in Haiti. Long-time SOIL research partner Dr. Rebecca Ryals joined the webinar and shared the results from her recently published paper that analyzes the climate benefits of SOIL’s ecological sanitation services. If you weren’t able to watch, The Institute for Local Self-Reliance has made the video available ...

Meet Leno, SOIL’s Lab Tech Extraordinaire

SOIL’s crew of 92 is composed of many different teams that are all working towards the same goal: developing a sustainable model for the affordable provision of safe sanitation in urban Haiti. I want to introduce you to one of SOIL’s small, but mighty ones: the lab tech team in Cap-Haitien. Ensuring Safety and Protecting the Environment What do they do? The lab team’s role is to analyze samples of waste and compost at different points in the waste treatment process to ensure our composting systems are functioning effectively and that our end product, Konpòs Lakay compost, is both free of pathogens and filled with of the nutrients needed ...

SOIL Completes Composting Site Expansion Project in Northern Haiti

Photo: Vic Hinterlang Late last year we shared some pretty exciting news with you all. After nearly doubling the amount of waste SOIL had been treating at our Northern Haiti composting site, we broke ground on a significant infrastructure expansion project to enable SOIL to more efficiently treat waste and to prepare our site for the continued growth of EkoLakay’s sanitation service. We’ve been hard at work to make these improvements and now have even bigger news to share – it’s complete! What Have We Built? Compost Batch Processing Unit  SOIL successfully completed construction on the entire compost batch processing unit ...

SOIL Staff Summer Project Bears Fruit

The SOIL team takes a lot of pride both in our lush office gardens and in the various plants that flourish throughout our composting sites. We love to encourage biodiversity by planting a wide variety of local species - whether that’s coconut trees, mango trees, or smaller flowery bushes like the beautiful bougainvillea seen throughout Haiti. In the backyards of our offices and across the country, these plants attract birds and insects and act as a peaceful oasis for many other species. Each day SOIL transforms human waste into rich, organic compost and this summer our staff decided to take our dedication to composting a step further by committ...

How We Perceive Waste Is Dependent Upon Our Mindsets

We often ask our visitors to guest write a blog post for the SOIL website to give our readers a chance to see how SOIL’s work looks from different perspectives. After spending a day dumping poop buckets, recent SOIL visitor, Benjamin Swift, had a lot to say about the concept of waste! I visited Haiti for the first time this spring and I am just beginning to get my feet wet in the ocean of complex issues that the country faces. Therefore getting a chance to stop by SOIL and see their work in action was a fascinating experience! I spent the first morning of my SOIL visit volunteering at SOIL’s composting waste treatment facility near Cap-Haitien. ...

SOIL U

Regular readers of the SOIL blog will know that in November our amazing weather station in Limonade went live, and that since that time, it has been sharing the local weather data with the world. Rainfall, temperature, wind direction and speed, pressure… it’s all there for anyone to access! Last month, the University of Limonade requested a tour of our waste treatment site so they could see the weather station and hear about how it works and what we do with the data. They were also interested in using the data in their own curriculum, as an educational tool, because weather data in Haiti can be quite difficult to obtain. Ultimately there ...

San Francisco Chronicle: Device Makes Turning Human Waste Into Compost Safer

By Stephanie M. Lee in the SF Gate. Original article here. Your toilet bowl may hold the key to replenishing forests, growing crops and saving countless gallons of water. And that's why Gary Andersen, a senior scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is so excited about poop. Andersen has invented a device that tracks the decomposition of compost made of human feces, a function that he says could help improve environmental health all over the world. In earthquake-ravaged Haiti, the technology is being used to monitor sanitary waste in an effort to accelerate the production of disease-free, nutrient-rich compost for agriculture and ...