6 results for tag: emergency relief


Hurricane Matthew: Lessons Learned

On October 1st, Hurricane Matthew turned just a few degrees to the east putting the southern peninsula of Haiti directly in its path. Three days later, 142 mph winds ripped over small mountain villages and coastal cities damaging or destroying nearly 150,000 homes and more than 80% of regional crops and livestock. Communities were inundated with rains, flooding latrines and septic tanks. Less than two months later, just as Haiti disappears from the headlines, the true effects of Hurricane Matthew are starting to hit. More than 3,500 suspected cases of cholera, a disease unknown to Haiti before it was introduced by the negligence of the United ...

Emergency Flood Relief

SOIL kindly asks for your support to provide emergency relief to the community of Shada, Cap-Haitien where spring rains have brought devastating floods. We don't currently have the discretionary funds in our budget to meet the critical needs of this community, and we ask you to please consider making a contribution today to help us purchase aquatabs (to purify drinking water), soap, bleach, emergency food supplies, and plastic boots for residents working on the relief effort. Fundraising Goal: $2,000 Deadline: April 20, 2013 Until we reach the emergency fundraising goal of $2,000, all donations to SOIL will be directed to Shada emergency relief. ...

Heavy Rains, Heavy Hearts

Heavy rains last Saturday flooded much of the city of Cap-Haitien, leaving people wading in water and debris up to their waists. The water was unusually slow to drain as the ocean inlet was partially blocked by construction for a new bridge. Brown opaque water filled the alleyways and houses, carrying clothes, bottles, plastic bags and other trash, and personal belongings. Men and women trudged through, carrying their babies and toddlers to stop them from drinking the foul water or drowning in it. Even the smallest of open wounds exposed to contaminated water increased the chances of disease transmission and infection. Water from wells became contam...

Haiti 6 Months Later: Frozen in Time

Six months later and sometimes it feels like we will be stuck in January 2010 forever. It as if we are frozen in time, looking out on the hillsides covered with tents.  Every once in a while we will notice a change, like the empty space where the church used to be on Delmas 53.  For years I would stay in the hotel across the street and be awakened by singing from that church. In January, when I returned to the hotel, the church was a mound of cement and twisted iron with a cross that dangled precariously into the street. Now there is just a hole, an empty space that still echoes with the voices of the choir. Sometimes we notice the ever growing ...

Update to Our Supporters

Dear friends, Tomorrow marks 6 months since the devastating earthquake. I wanted to take this evening to reflect on the past 6 months and to share with you some of our activities and challenges. It has been months since my last letter and I apologize for the lack of communication.  Since my last update in March our team has been working 50-60 hours per week on sanitation projects in both Port au Prince and Cap Haitien and it has been hard to find space for reflection and communication. It is late Sunday night and the moon is shining down on the capital, reflecting on the storm washed streets and plastic tarps as the city sleeps, reminding me of how ...

Breaking the Cycle of Disease by Closing the Nutrient Cycle: SOIL and the Sanitation Crisis in Port-au-Prince

Dear friends, I am sorry that I have been out of touch for the past several weeks.  Every day is like a lifetime and at the end we just collapse into bed after a cold shower, and in the morning we sit up and look out at the camp spread before us and the whirlwind begins again.  But most of us have managed to hold on to our sanity, tethering our minds to our work.  As the weeks go by the city begins to look more familiar, the shattered buildings have become a part of my mindscape and there are moments when I barely notice them.  People wind through the traffic jams and the streets are lined with vendors, people who have left the camps during the ...