6 results for tag: environment


Meet Tidou

Lucny Joasil, better known to everybody as Tidou, has been connected to SOIL for more than a decade. He first met SOIL Co-Founder and Executive Director Sasha Kramer in 2008 when SOIL was looking to hire Haitian Creole-English teachers and translators. That was Tidou’s initial role with SOIL and over the years he has moved into new positions with our team, each time taking on more and more responsibility. Now, he’s the Assistant Composting Supervisor at SOIL’s waste treatment site outside of Cap-Haïtien. Reporting directly to SOIL’s Composting Supervisor Job Etienne, Tidou helps collect data, supervises composting activities, oversees ...

“Priceless:” A Young Agronomist Tests SOIL Compost

Nitchenson Henry grew up in northwestern Haiti and now lives in Limonade, not far from SOIL’s composting site. He’s known what he wanted to do for a living for as long he can remember and is now proud to be working towards it as an agronomy student at a local university. Nitchenson’s hope is one that we share at SOIL: to find ways to restore soil health and agricultural productivity across Haiti. Look at that beautiful pepper! During a visit to SOIL’s composting site in northern Haiti for one of his college courses, Nitchenson had a chance to learn about our ecological sanitation services and see first-hand how we treat and transform ...

Ozy: Why Cities are Starting to Shun Sewers

Photo: Vic Hinterlang It's time to think outside the sewer, writes Alia Dharssi for Ozy in a new article on how sanitation practitioners like SOIL are leading the way for a global sanitation revolution. "Globally, more than 1 billion people live in slums with inadequate or no toilets. That condition is spawning a health crisis, with research linking poor sanitation to the transmission of diseases like cholera, malnutrition and intestinal worms. Less than 10 percent of wastewater is treated in some countries such as Lebanon and Cambodia, according to a 2017 United Nations report. But modern sewer systems, which cost millions to build and ...

Lift Economy: Poop to the Rescue for Eroding Soils

Image: AJ+ Untreated human waste can do incredible harm to both public health and the environment. But can the power of poop be harnessed to rescue eroding soil and create sustainable livelihoods? Regular SOIL blog readers know the answer to that question is: yes! Dr. Sasha Kramer, SOIL's co-founder and Executive Director, sat down with our friends at Lift Economy for their podcast B the Change to chat about SOIL's work to develop social business models for the provision of household sanitation in vulnerable urban communities across Haiti. Listen to the Episode: Don't miss reading the article that accompanies the episode, which is available ...

Lessons on Restoring Depleted Soil from Haiti

Photo: Vic Hinterlang Too often, the story of Haiti begins and ends with the problems facing the country. However, there are stories, largely untold, about the work being done to address Haiti’s interconnected issues and create lasting change. SOIL's Executive Director Sasha Kramer shared one of these stories in a guest authored piece for RSF Social Finance's Quarterly Publication last month. From the Article:  "SOIL is tackling Haiti’s sanitation and soil fertility crises by pioneering an innovative and earth-replenishing technology that is spreading across the world. Ecological sanitation (EcoSan) solutions capture nutrients that are ...

Breaking the Cycle of Disease by Closing the Nutrient Cycle: SOIL and the Sanitation Crisis in Port-au-Prince

Dear friends, I am sorry that I have been out of touch for the past several weeks.  Every day is like a lifetime and at the end we just collapse into bed after a cold shower, and in the morning we sit up and look out at the camp spread before us and the whirlwind begins again.  But most of us have managed to hold on to our sanity, tethering our minds to our work.  As the weeks go by the city begins to look more familiar, the shattered buildings have become a part of my mindscape and there are moments when I barely notice them.  People wind through the traffic jams and the streets are lined with vendors, people who have left the camps during the ...