17 results for tag: Sasha Kramer


The Guardian: Food security: Is it Time to Recognise the Nutritional Value of Human Waste?

"'Given this natural aversion to human waste, it takes rigorous research, careful implementation and skillful social marketing to overcome the ‘yuck’ factor,' says Kramer. 'That said, we found that, in Haiti, once people are able to see, smell and touch the final product they are more than eager to test it in their gardens.' SOIL in The Guardian

Food Tank: Food Hero: Sasha Kramer, How SOIL Works at the Nexus of Human Rights and Ecology

By Sasha Kramer, in Food Tank, March 16, 2014 Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) is an organization based in Haiti that was founded in 2006 with a mission of ensuring nutrients for all through the transformation of wastes into resources, or more precisely by turning poop into soil.  We believe that the key to equitable access to nutrients, in a world filled with inequality, is to empower communities to harness the power of ecological processes to transform a dangerous pollutant into a valuable resource. SOIL was founded on the philosophy of liberation ecology: every human being has the right to health and happiness and waste does ...

April 2013 Newsletter: Shada Flood

Dear friends, All of our long time supporters are by now familiar with the community of Shada in Cap-Haitien, where SOIL has been working since 2006.  This is the home of the magnificent and charismatic Madame Bwa and the thousands of residents that inspire us with their courage and resilience.  That courage was once again put to the test when spring rains brought massive flooding to the community of Shada earlier this week. Flooding is not new in Shada, as the low-lying neighborhood has always been hit hard during heavy rains, but this year there is something new which has put the community even more at risk.  In an effort to facilitate access ...

Theo Talks Episode 3: Sexing the Fish

Join SOIL's Regional Director, Theo Huitema, on another adventure in EcoSan. In Theo Talks Episode 3, you'll see SOIL's Job Etienne, Nick Preneta and Sasha Kramer attempting to "sex" fish. In the background you'll see Theo's house, made out of a former compost bin, at the SOIL farm and tree nursery in Cap-Haitien, Haiti. We're still looking for a name for this beautiful site and we need you help. Enter a name suggestion in the Name the SOIL Tree Nursery and Farm Contest and you'll have a chance to win some great SOIL prizes! Check out the full Theo Talks series.

Consilience: Transforming Haiti from the Bottom Up

By Victoria Lauredo in Consilience: The Journal of Sustainable Development, October 17, 2012. Amidst the buzz of CEOs, celebrities and heads of state attending last month’s Clinton Global Initiative’s 2012 Annual Meeting floats in Dr. Sasha Kramer, a 36 year-old ecologist and human rights observer who has been working in Haiti since 2004. Nothing about the wispy blonde’s delicate frame would indicate that she spends her days rescuing substances most of us would rather forget down the toilet. But excrement recycler is what she is. As Executive Director and Co-Founder of SOIL (Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods), Dr. Kramer promotes ...

UNCCD News: Ecological Sanitation for Healthy Soils

By the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in the UNCCD News Issue 4.2/4.3, March-June 2012. When confronted with two or more related challenges – let’s say from the fields of biodiversity and desertification – the ability to multi-task is often essential. But it’s difficult to imagine how sustainable land management and sanitation can be combined to create a win-win situation. The non-governmental organisation SOIL (Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods) has managed this balancing act in Haiti, using compost gained through ecological sanitation to regenerate the country’s soils. Meeting people’s daily food needs is ...

Huffington Post: Empowering Haiti Through Sanitation, Sasha Kramer Named "Greatest Person of the Day"

By Julia Steers, Huffington Post, January 13, 2011 Social change rarely makes for glamorous work, but Dr. Sasha Kramer's sanitation efforts in Haiti redefine the phrase "down and dirty." As a Stanford graduate student studying ecology, Sasha decided that upon graduation, she would go to Haiti to focus on sustainable agriculture. She followed through, making her first trip to Haiti in 2004 as a human rights observer shortly after a volatile political coup and fell in love with the country. Sasha was taken with the "communal spirit and courage" Haitians displayed in the face of shootings in the streets and fear of retribution after the coup, as well ...